Baby Name Revealed After Royal Family Website Accidentally Publishes Name? After Realizing The Massive Mistake, The Rush To Erase All Traces

babies
April 26, 2018

It’s been days since the birth of Britain’s newest prince and the world can hardly contain its excitement! The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge welcomed their third child, a son, on April 23rd, 2018, making them a family of five.

The world rejoiced with news of Kate’s pregnancy, and the guessing game of whether she was having a boy or girl proved to be a hot topic has nearly every media publication was talking about it. But if you thought the pregnancy was getting a lot of traffic, the newest prince’s name- or lack thereof- is taking over the internet.

It’s only been a few days since the prince’s arrival, but the world is going crazy not knowing his name! Kate waited for two days before sharing Prince George’s and Princess Charlotte’s name with the public, and The Queen waited an entire month before sharing Prince Charles' name… but the waiting game of Baby Cambridge is almost getting to be too much!

Many have speculated that the family hasn’t decided on a name yet. Although one very (and we mean very) prominent and trusted source might have just leaked otherwise…

The Royal Family’s website, www.royal.uk, recently had a live page for the newest little prince. While several members have a page dedicated to their history, a new page was added only hours after Baby #3 was born.

The page was called www.royal.uk/prince-albert. This is shocking because there is not “Prince Albert” in the royal family other than Albert, Prince Consort, who was born in 1819. The page was only recently added, and causing people to think that the page was dedicated to the newest prince… whose name would be Albert.

Immediately, the page’s activity was aborted. Immediately following the no-longer live webpage, a message appeared that read"Access Denied.”

Albert is currently in the running for a baby name for the little prince, especially after this highly trusted source accidentally release. It’s hard to be certain, but it’s also hard to justify a web-page for a “Prince Albert” coming into activity only hours after the baby is born and then immediately dissolving it. What do you think?

https://rumble.com/embed/u8sop.v29st3/

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