Shocking New Evidence Reveals Scientists Are ‘99% Sure’ They’ve Located Amelia Earhart’s Remains

March 07, 2018

In 1937, American aviator mysteriously vanished while flying over the Pacific Ocean with the navigator, Fred Noonan. This mission went down in history for multiple reasons, one being that she was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, which was an incredible feat in that day.

Her remains were never located, making it seem as though she disappeared into thin air. Many studies have been done since this occurrence and all have seemingly fallen short.

According to a recent in-depth study performed by Richard Jantz, professor emeritus of anthropology and director of emeritus of UT’s Forensic Anthropology Center, her remains may have already been located.

In 1940, remains were found in a potential area in which she could have landed. D.W. Hoodless conducted an examination on the remains but eventually concluded that the bones belonged to a small, stocky European man.

Jantz re-examined these set of remains using modern day technology and found some rather startling information. According to sources, based on the sex, ancestry, and stature of the skeletal measurements, Hoodless incorrectly labeled the sex. This set of bones had an uncanny similarity to what Earhart’s would have been.

Based on the evidence the following statement was made:

“[Earhart] was known to have been in the area of Nikumaroro Island, she went missing, and human remains were discovered which are entirely consistent with her and inconsistent with most other people.”

While we might not fully know what happened, this turn of events has proven that thanks to modern day technology, we are one step closer to solving this decade-long disappearance case.

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