The Last Second Sound Of Ice Falling Through A 300-Foot Deep Glacial Borehole Will Leave You In Utter Disbelief

March 12, 2018

Antarctica is one of the most mysterious places on Planet Earth. Most of the world will only ever experience the continent via technology. Thankfully, there are some very devoted researchers who have given their lives to discovering the mysteries of the frozen tundra that is Antarctica.

Peter Neff is one of the resident researchers in Antarctica. After months of long and freezing cold days, he’s managing to have a little fun with his research.

Peter and his team drilled through a massive glacier in hopes to gain a more in-depth understanding of how the layers of a glacier were created. After drilling a 300- foot deep borehole in the glacier, they thought it’d be interested to see what would happen after they dropped a piece of the glacier back down down the hole.

While filming the simple experiment, they managed to make a shocking discovery.

The sound that the ice made while falling down the hole is stunning the world. At first, the sound is very underwhelming and sounds similar to ice skates on ice. But as the ice falls further down the borehole, its sound becomes more mysterious.

At the very last second, the ice makes a “ping” sound that sounds like something you’d hear in space. It’s the most bizarre sound!

Peter explained that the sound change at the last second comes from the ice shattering into hundreds of pieces at the bottom surface of the 300-foot borehole. He shares that the pieces “Slam at once into the bottom of the 90 m-deep hole—sending reverberations back to the surface that likely would have caused hearing damage if you placed your ear directly above the hole.” A couple feet away from the hole, however, the last second sound resembles that of a Hollywood spaceship racing scene.

Check out the sound for yourself in the video below! This is one of the most fascinating sounds we’ve ever heard and it’s nothing like what we’d ever expected to come from a 300- foot borehole in a glacier!

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