U.S. Senator Dies After A Lifetime Of Fighting For Animal-Welfare

latest
April 13, 2018

John Melcher served as a Montana Congressman for twenty years before passing away on Thursday, April 12. John passed away in his family home in Missoula, Montana, according to his daughter, Joan.

https://twitter.com/newsparot/status/984871978539606016

He was born in Sioux City, Iowa on September 6, 1924, to Anthony Melcher and Nell Mentor, who divorced when he was 8. John and his brother, Robert, stayed with his dad’s relatives while his dad went on the road as a traveling salesman. Although when he was older he would occasionally accompany his father, and that was when he fell in love with Montana.

https://twitter.com/hollykmichels/status/984843163591479296

He grew up in Dubuque and Ashton, Iowa, on a little ranch only 10 miles outside of Oelrichs, South Dakota. He would often ride a horse to and from Oelrichs High School, before graduating in 1942.

https://twitter.com/nytpolitics/status/984870857699987456

A World War II veteran and large animal veterinarian, his life in politics began as a small town alderman. In 1969, as a 45-year-old, he went to Washington as one of Montana’s two U.S. Representatives. In January of 1977, Mr. Mansfield, the longtime majority leader, retired, and John stepped up to serve two full Senate terms until 1989.

https://twitter.com/Alexrosstweets/status/984881222147960832

He married his high school sweetheart, Ruth Klein, and together they had six children. One of their son’s, David, passed away from Reye’s syndrome at only 6 years old.

https://twitter.com/KierForCongress/status/984856580276436993

In January 1978, veteran Senator Lee Metcalf passed away, leaving Dr. Melcher to become Montana’s senior senator. Melcher dedicated his time in office to defending farm subsidies and animal welfare, doing everything he could to help.

https://twitter.com/AAVMC/status/969657682406748160

In 1984, he made an amendment to the Animal Welfare Act of 1966, requiring that researchers take into account the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates. His work earned him the attention of famed primatologist, Jane Goodall, who thanked him for the work he had done to help take care of animals.

https://twitter.com/gkearney/status/984867673199783936

Please pray for John’s family as he will be sorely missed by his children, 10 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren.

https://twitter.com/Lupnto/status/984879400188493824

This is a horrible story, and we know that sometimes we need a reminder of the good in the world at a time like this, so be sure to check out the video below!

https://rumble.com/embed/u8sop.v26neb/